Hiking & Walking Trails

Discover plenty of great walking and hiking trails just waiting to be explored.

Hiking & Walking Trails

Discover Mandurah’s
great walking and
hiking trails waiting
to be explored

Do you also know this feeling when you need to get away from it all, when it’s time to get out of that box that is the office, and the home, and the car, and take a walk or a hike? Well, we’ve got plenty of great walking and hiking trails here in Mandurah and the Peel Region, just waiting for you to be explored.

Mandurah and Peel Region’s Top Walking Trails

It might not be the quickest way to get around, but in the famous words of a Mr Ferris Bueller: life moves pretty fast, if you don’t stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.

So slow down as you walk one of these idyllic tracks – while smelling those roses, as ordered, you’ll also find yourself coming across gorges, dense forests, wetlands and suspended bridges to hike up the excitement on these trails.

Please note to check https://parks.dpaw.wa.gov.au/ for updates on track conditions for those in national state parks before you put your sneakers on.

1. Kitty’s Gorge Walk.

Location: Jarrahdale. Distance: 14km return

As the name suggests, this walk takes you across the rocky terrain of Kitty’s Gorge, following the Serpentine River to eventually bring you to the falls.
The story goes that Kitty was actually a cow who wandered away and was found months later down the gorge. Don’t be like Kitty. Prepare yourself for a five-hour walk of moderate difficulty, with some uneven ground and steep stretches of track.

From here, you can also access Baldwin’s Bluff, which is about 6km all up and offers extended views from the bluff.

Kitty's Gorge Walk Trail - Photo by Suzanne Jones
Image Credit: Suzanne Jones

2. Len Howard Conservation Park.

Location: Erskine. Distance: 2km – 6km

A short, easy nature track looping around the wetlands, this trail offers bird watching spots and is connected to a reserve that’s perfect for a picnic.
From the carpark at the end of Glendart Ct, the short trail will take you to a bird hide just 2km away.

The trail is partly comprised of a boardwalk over the glistening wetlands.
For the more enthusiastic hiker, a longer walk along the Erskine Walk Trail of approximately 6km and a two-hour return is also available.

3. Tullis Bridge and Tullis Rail Trails

Location: Boddington. Distance: 3 – 16km

Starting at – you guessed it – Tullis Bridge, this walk follows a flat, easy trail along the picturesque Hotham River.

The track weaves through bushland and back to the bridge site, which is a great spot for a picnic.

If you’re after a longer walk, the Tullis Rail Trail starts from the Boddington Lions Rodeo Grounds and is about 16km, finishing up at the wooden bridge.

Tullis-Bridge-Boddington

4. Riverside Heartwalk

Location: Mandurah. Distance: 2km

Just to the east of Mandurah, this 90 minute walk follows a southern part of the Serpentine River, with a boardwalk that leads out to the water to offer breathtaking vistas.

While the odd boat is a pretty common sight, if you’re lucky, you might spot a couple dolphins, known to visit the area.

Riverside Heartwalk Mandurah - Visit Mandurah

5. Island Point Walk

Location: Herron. Distance: 2km – 3km

A popular bird watching and picnic spot, Island Point Reserve also offers short walks able to be taken on by young and old.

You can walk the short loop of 2.3km, or the longer 3.3km, around the gorgeous wilderness of the wetlands.

6. Pinjarra Heritage Walk Trail

Location: Pinjarra. Distance: 1.2km

A fun track that crosses the Pinjarra suspension bridge, this walk takes you not just over the Murray River and its surrounding bushland but also through the historic town itself – making it a good choice for those not as keen for full-on bushwalking.

Ready to go? For further information and maps on the walking trails mentioned above visit your local visitor centre.

Pinjarra Heritage Walk - Suspension Bridge - Visit Mandurah

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Mountain Biking & Cycling

Experience the landscape whilst pedalling your trusted two-wheeler the best cycling trails.

Mountain Biking & Cycling

Explore winding
forest tracks and
Mandurah’s best
cycling trails

Exploring those winding forest tracks or traipsing across suspension bridges really can only be done on foot, but you just can’t see the same breadth of landscape than when pedalling your trusted two-wheeler across Mandurah and the Peel region’s best cycling trails.

As mountain biking can be dangerous it is advised that you download the Emergency+ App before your next ride.

1. Murray Valley Trails

New to the Peel region is the Murray Valley Trails, 3 purpose-built downhill mountain bike trails are open and ready for action.

These are the first of over 25km planned trails for the Murray Valley network – a real coup for the region and caters for beginner, intermediate and advanced riders.

While the longest trail is 2.3km and for beginner riders – the moderate trail Boom Boom at 1.4km and advance trail Bam Bam at 1.3km definitely pack a punch that will challenge the most confident of riders.

2. Bridges Ride

Location: Mandurah. Distance: 4.5km.

One of the best ways to soak in all Mandurah has to offer, this 4.5km ride takes you around foreshore and canals, before taking you out to nearby Samphire wetlands.

On your 90 minute ride you will also come across Sutton Farm on Old Coast Road, a heritage listed site dating back to the 1860s.

Cycling-Mandurah-Boardwalk

3. Turner Hill Trail

Location: Turner Hill. Distance: 11km

Located between Pinjarra and Dwellingup, this track is strictly for off-road bikes.

The trail is marked as moderately difficult and will take one to three hours to complete.

However, there’s also a 5km short cut, and a much easier 1.1km loop for the kids (or the less confident biker).

4. Langford Park

Location: Jarrahdale. Distance: 22km

If it’s pure off-road or mountain biking you’re after, this is one of the most popular spots in the state to kick up some dirt.

There are a whole bunch of trails, the longest of which is 17km long, with options for beginner to advanced riders.

Choose your adventure and download the Langford Park Map.

5. Halls Head Coastal Trail

Location: Halls Head. Distance: 12km

This 12km stretch along the Mandurah Coastline is perfect for biker and walker alike.

Starting from Doddies Beach, there are boardwalk sections of this track and frequent benches for you to take that much-needed rest as you look out for dolphins in the stretching sea beyond.

Halls-Head-Coastal-Trail-Visit Mandurah

6. Marrinup Cycle Trail

Location: Marrinup. Distance: 8km

North West of Dwellingup lies the Marrinup State Forest which is near the old Marrinup townsite and what remains of a prisoner of war camp.

Whether it’s the history, the beautiful flora and fauna, or the established biking trails you’re there for, this is an incredible spot in the Peel region to visit.

The Marrinup cycle trail is a purpose-built 8km track, starting and finishing at the old Marrinup campsite, with a slight detour taking you to the POW camp.

Ready to go? For further information and maps on the biking trails mentioned above visit your local visitor centre.

Lane-Poole-Reserve-MTB-Trail-Dwellingup

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Caravanning & Camping

On the beach, in the bush or based in town, you’ll find the perfect spot for your next caravan or camping adventure.

Caravanning & Camping

Find the perfect
spot for your next
caravan or camping
adventure

Sleep under the stars at one of the region’s many national park camp sites, or stay at a lakeside tourist park and wake up to breathtaking views.

To enjoy all that Mandurah has to offer, there’s Belvedere Caravan Park near the city centre, Mandurah Caravan & Tourist Park on Pinjarra Road or Twin Waters Caravan Park in Dawesville.

You can camp right on the riverbank in the heart of Pinjarra or Boddington, on the foothills of the Darling Ranges in Serpentine, amongst towering trees in Dwellingup or lakeside at Herron Point near Pinjarra and Lake Navarino in Waroona.

Camping in a national park or reserve is a great way to connect with nature. The campgrounds in the region, which are either on a first-come, first-served bases or booked in advance via https://parkstaybookings.dbca.wa.gov.au include:

 

Lane Poole Reserve

Instant relaxation is guaranteed at Lane Poole Reserve. You’ll just love this national park with nine different campgrounds within the reserve providing a range of facilities. Fees apply and a park pass is required to enter the national park. Except for Nanga Mill and Nanga Townsite, booking in advance is required.

 

Marrinup Townsite

Marrinup Townsite near Dwellingup is suitable for tents, has toilet facilities and is pet friendly. Camping fees apply and booking in advance is not possible.

 

Martins Tank Campground

Unwind and connect with nature at this beautiful campground near Preston Beach, right on the banks of Martins Tank Lake. The campsites at Martins Tank Campground are suitable for tents, campervans, camper trailers and caravans. Fees apply and you must book in advance.

 

RV-friendly towns

Maximum stay:

24 hrs

Pinjarra, Waroona Oval (May to Oct only), Preston Beach and Drakesbrook Weir

48 hrs

Boddingtton

72 hrs

Jarrahdale

 

Free Dump Points are available in: Mandurah, Pinjarra, Waroona and Boddington.

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Natural Attractions & Nature Parks

Experience Mandurah’s diverse range of nature experiences.

Natural Attractions & Nature Parks

Discover a diverse
range of nature
experiences in the
Mandurah region

The Mandurah region boasts a wealth of protected waterways, national parks, nature reserves and nature parks. See our top choices of what to explore on your next visit!

Yalgorup National Park

Stretching from south of Mandurah to Preston Beach, the park is known for its ten elongated lakes, beautiful tuart and peppermint woodlands and the ancient thrombolite reef at Lake Clifton. The park provides visitors panoramic views of the beaches, dunes and lakes, walking trails and picnic spots. It is home to a variety of native animals, birds and wildflowers are prolific in season.

Creery Wetlands Nature Reserve

The 29-hectare nature reserve has a series of connected boardwalks and pathways with informative signage and bird-watching areas. Whether you are interested in birds, wildlife or just enjoy a stroll by the estuary, the area is a fascinating and enjoyable environment to explore.

Samphire Cove Nature Reserve, Halls Head

Located on the north-western side of the Peel Inlet, the reserve includes scenic boardwalks, two bird hides (one with all-abilities access), an information shelter and a barbecue area nearby.

Len Howard Conservation Park, Erskine

Situated by the shores of the Peel Inlet and Mandurah Estuary, the park includes walking trails along the estuary and wetlands, bird-watching sites and a grassed area for picnics.

Serpentine National Park

Best known for the waterfall that cascades over a sheer granite rock face, the park abounds with scenic beauty and is a sanctuary for an array of plants and animals. It is a great place for bushwalks or a picnic by the falls.

Lake Goegrup Nature Reserve

Forming part of the Serpentine River system, the reserve includes a walk trail that runs along the Serpentine River, providing an experience of river and wetland environments.

Lane Poole Reserve, Dwellingup

The Murray River meandering through towering jarrah forest and valleys make this reserve, just outside of Dwellingup, an enchanting place to visit. Covering more than 55,000 hectares, the park offers plenty of space and options for a range of outdoor activities. Stay overnight at one of the many campsites or pack a picnic and enjoy a day trip exploring this stunning location.

Island Point Reserve, Herron

Situated on the shores of Harvey Estuary, the reserve provides a lovely sheltered beach for swimming or bird watching and bush trails to wander.

Herron Point, Birchmont

Between Mandurah and Pinjarra, the area is ideal for camping, picnics, swimming, walking and birdwatching.

Header image by Lisa Watson Photography

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Animal & Wildlife Encounters

The Mandurah region is the perfect destination to immerse yourself in nature.

Animal & Wildlife Encounters

The perfect destination
to easily spot native
wildlife as you explore
by water or land

The fresh air, blue skies, pristine forests and stunning waterways of the Mandurah region make it the perfect destination to immerse yourself in nature. Wonder at the world-class natural beauty and easily spot native wildlife as you explore by water or land.

Here are our insider tips of where to spot wild dolphins, kangaroos, emus and waterbirds:

Dolphins – regularly visit the calm waters in the centre of Mandurah and are a joy to watch while dining alfresco by the waterfront or just strolling along the foreshore. Some residents say that you are almost 100% guaranteed to see a dolphin at the Dawesville Cut as they have never once walked their dogs here without seeing a dolphin.

Kangaroos – graze on Melros Beach Reserve and Florida Beach Reserve in the late afternoon. You can also spot them close-up near the picnic area at Serpentine Falls National Park.

Emus – can often be spotted walking along the lake shores at Lake Clifton at Yalgorup National Park.

Black Swans – mass between October and March at Lake Pollard at Yalgorup National Park.

Red-tailed black cockatoos – are native to south western Australia and can be seen high up in the trees from the Emu Walk Trail that leads from Dwellingup town centre to the Forest Discovery Centre.

Visit our Wildlife Parks

Peel Zoo

Peel Zoo is a privately funded, hands-on zoo and wildlife sanctuary, in a lush setting on the banks of the Murray River in Pinjarra. Visiting Peel Zoo is a bit like visiting one of your own family, who just happens to have hundreds of pets. Get close to and learn about over 100 species of birds and animals that will capture your imagination, including: koalas, wombats, dingoes, exotic birds, snakes, reptiles, bengal cats, quolls, possums and owls! The walk-through aviary and Tasmanian Devils are star attractions.

The Tasmanian Devil breeding programme is of vital importance. This species is endangered in the wild because of an incurable facial tumour disease and Peel Zoo’s breeding program contributes to the Tasmanian Devil’s long-term future.

Kids can also experience working at the zoo with the ‘Zookeeper 4 a Day’ program.

Cohunu Koala Park

Located in Byford, Cohunu Koala Park has a colony of up to 15 koalas which you can pay to hold. You can also hand feed the native wildlife that roams free in the park.

Farm Animals

Caraholly Orchard – At this beautiful farmers market every Sunday you can hand feed the cows with apples from the orchard.

Midway Farmstall – Just off Forrest Highway, near Pinjarra Road, this is the perfect place to stop for delicious coffee and a bite to eat while the kids play with the farm animals.

Ferndale Springs Farm – Gain insights into a real working farm in Coolup. Mustering sheep, feeding cattle and eating damper and kangaroo are just some of the things you will experience here.

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Birdwatching

Bird life is abundant in Mandurah and the Peel Region which make it a perfect location for bird watchers and nature lovers.

Birdwatching

Mandurah and the
Peel Region are the
perfect locations for
bird watchers

Situated at the northern end of the Peel Inlet, Mandurah is the key point in a chain of lakes and estuaries from Perth to Bunbury. These expanses of open water are a habitat for up to 100,000 waterbirds.

Localities such as the Creery Wetlands are recognised under International Agreements as key habitats for migratory waders. To the West is the Darling Range with its diverse Jarrah forest flora and habitat for native birds.

Bird life is abundant in Mandurah and the Peel Region which make it a perfect location for bird watchers and nature lovers. The bird life around the Estuary is just as impressive. Over 130 different species of native and migratory birds nest, breed and feed on the estuary.

The Peel-Harvey Estuary is classified as a Wetland of International Importance in 1990 by the Ramsar Convention.

Some of the best places to observe water birds are between the two Mandurah bridges on the shores, amongst the marshes and on the islands of the Peel Inlet. Here you will see waterbirds feeding, Darter, cormorants, yellow-billed Spoonbill amongst others.

 

Find our insider tips below for some of the best birdwatching spots in Mandurah:

Mandurah Estuary

Between the two Mandurah bridges the shores, marshes and islands of Peel Inlet provide excellent opportunities to observe waterbirds feeding. Get your binoculars and watch out for Darter, Cormorants, Yellow-billed Spoonbill (occasionally Royal Spoonbill) and Blackwinged.

Mandurah Harbour & Dolphin Pool

These are good areas to observe Caspian, Crested and Fairy Tern. In summer among the waders are Bar-tailed Godwit, Eastern Curlew, Ruddy Turnstone, Australian Pied Oystercatcher and Grey Plover.

Directions:

Travel to Dolphin Drive, Mandurah

Len Howard Conservation Park

The park contains 60 hectares of bush on the north western shore of Peel Inlet and features a nature trail (Erskine nature trail) with boardwalks over wetlands.

Birds you may see on your walk include:
  • Splendid Wren
  • Black-face Cuckoo-shrike
  • Willie Wagtail
  • Grey Fantail
  • Golden Whistler
Waterbirds you may see on your walk:
  • White-faced Heron
  • Black Swan
  • Royal Spoonbill
  • Darter
  • Little Pied Cormorant
  • Pied Oyster Catcher
Directions:

Travel to Len Howard Drive, Mandurah

Coodanup and Creery Wetlands

One of the Peel Yalgorup Wetlands System’s must-see spots is the Creery Wetlands, made up of a 29-hectare nature reserve that’s connected with a series of boardwalks and pathways enabling you to enjoy this unique ecosystem where over 130 different species of native and migratory birds have been spotted. Pelicans, the rare red tail black cockatoo, black swans and osprey breed and nest here.

From the shore you can see Boundary Island, a nesting place for Fairy Tern. The bay inshore of Creery Island supports large numbers of Bar-tailed Godwit, Eastern Curlew, Great Knot, Banded Stilt and Pacific Australian White Ibis and Yellow-billed Spoonbill who come here to feed from nearby breeding colonies.

Samphire Cove is part of the 29 hectare Creery Wetlands and is on the edge of the Peel Inlet. There are walking trails, information shelters and viewing huts and platforms for enthusiastic birdwatchers. The saltmarsh and shallow waters are an important roosting and feeding area for waterbirds and shorebirds which migrate to the Mandurah area every year from Northern Asia and Alaska.

Our tip:

The best way to discover (or rediscover) what makes these stunning wetlands and the remarkable wildlife so special is on a guided walking tour with Ways to Nature.

Directions:

Travel one kilometre east towards Pinjarra. Turn south along Wanjeep Street to Peel Inlet (Coodanup).

Lake Goegrup & Black Lake

These lakes are important waterbird feeding and breeding areas. You’ll find red-necked Avocet there throughout the year. Black Lake is a winter habitat for large flocks of Musk Duck.

Directions:

Follow Gordon Road to Lakes, Patterson and Dunkerton Roads.

Header image by Karyn Ellis

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Dolphin Watching

A visit to Mandurah wouldn’t be complete without the sighting of at least 1 dolphin.

Dolphin Watching

A visit to Mandurah
wouldn’t be complete
without the sighting
of at least 1 dolphin.

The Mandurah dolphins that inhabit the Peel-Harvey Estuary and adjacent coastal waters are Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins. They are highly social creatures that can often be found traveling in groups of 5 – 15 dolphins or even higher.

Our Mandurah Dolphins

The Mandurah dolphins that inhabit the Peel-Harvey Estuary and adjacent coastal waters are Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins. They are highly social creatures that can often be found traveling in groups of 5 – 15 dolphins or even higher. Females have large networks of female friends, whilst males form such strong bonds with one another that “alliances” can last a lifetime. Juveniles spend several years with their family learning everything from social etiquette to vital hunting skills. Mandurah’s inland waterways offer protection for birthing and an abundance of fish for feeding, making this area an ideal playground for dolphins.

Best way to watch dolphins

Whilst you can see dolphins in Mandurah all year round, the best time for dolphin watching is between September and May.

A dolphin cruise is a great way to see these friendly creatures and enjoy a scenic tour. The friendly, playful dolphins often surf on the wake of the boat, sometimes stopping to take a good look at the people on board!

Or hire a boat, kayak or canoe and seek them out for yourself. It’s truly magical when they suddenly pop up right next to you to join you on your very own water adventure.

Best locations for dolphins spotting in Mandurah

You can spot Mandurah’s dolphins playing in the estuary, boat harbour, Serpentine and Murray River and in the Indian Ocean.

Whether you are on or by the water, it will be hard to miss our friendly locals. The Dawesville Cut, Mandjar Bay, Mandurah Estuary and Mandurah Ocean Marina are considered particularly good spots to see dolphins.

Header image by: Bruce Ellis

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The ultimate aquatic and nature playground. Start planning your Mandurah adventure today!

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